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Ladybirds – wolves in sheep's clothing

CSIRO Media Release – 22 June 2011
Ref 11/61
Wolf in sheep's clothing: a predatory ladybird larva (Cryptolaemus montrouzieri) is disguised and protected by its woolly coat of wax filaments. This species-rich beetle family includes much more than the familiar, red-and-black spotted ladybirds inhabiting our gardens.

Image credit – David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org

Image credit – A. Slipinski, CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences/Australian Biological Resources Study
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Soft-bodied larvae without wax filaments or defensive chemicals. This larvae are from true lady beetles that are agile runners on plant surfaces, have long legs and are coloured. Soft-bodied larvae with wax and glands removed for photograph.

Image credit – Adam Slipinski, CSIRO

Image credit – Adam Slipinski, CSIRO
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Hard shelled adult lady beetle Hard shelled adult lady beetle related to the true lady beetles that are agile plant runners and coloured.

Image credit – Adam Slipinski, CSIRO

Image credit – Adam Slipinski, CSIRO
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