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Cabernet Sauvignon grapes showing the distinctive patterns of uneven ripening, with some berries fully coloured while others remain green

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CSIRO researchers have discovered a new method using naturally occurring plant growth regulators which growers could use to control when their grapes ripen, without affecting wine quality.

Some berries in a particular bunch of grapes will often accumulate sugar faster, thus ripening sooner than the others. This makes it difficult for wineries to choose the appropriate harvest time without compromising the wine-making potential of the grapes.

Applying plant-growth regulators to the grapes can greatly increase the number of berries reaching optimal maturity at the same time.

Photographer : Chris Davies

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<table style="border:1px solid;padding:2px; width:310px;" ><tr><td><a href="https://www.scienceimage.csiro.au/image/11237/"><img src="https://www.scienceimage.csiro.au/images/embed/300_200_BP12161.jpg" width="300" alt="Cabernet Sauvignon grapes showing the distinctive patterns of uneven ripening, with some berries fully coloured while others remain green" style="margin: 0 0 5px 0; border: 0px;"></a><br/><a href="https://www.scienceimage.csiro.au/image/11237/">Cabernet Sauvignon grapes showing the distinctive patterns of uneven ripening, with some berries fully coloured while others remain green</a><br />by CSIRO</td></tr></table>
Cabernet Sauvignon grapes showing the distinctive patterns of uneven ripening, with some berries fully coloured while others remain green
Cabernet Sauvignon grapes showing the distinctive patterns of uneven ripening, with some berries fully coloured while others remain green
by CSIRO

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