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CSIRO scientist Dr Mohinudeen Faiz analyses a coal sample with methane-producing micro-organisms under the microscope

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Coal seam methane is becoming a widely used energy source, particularly in eastern Australia where a number of basins produce significant volumes of methane from coal seams. Coal seam methane is considerably less polluting than other fossil fuels and already accounts for over 40 per cent of Queensland’s natural gas consumption.

The Energy Transformed Flagship is investigating where methane production can be enhanced by augmenting and stimulating natural microbial activity. Researchers are conducting laboratory experiments to understand the processes involved and are culturing the micro-organisms to determine the viability of using them to optimise methane generation.

Photographer : Chris Taylor

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<table style="border:1px solid;padding:2px; width:310px;" ><tr><td><a href="https://www.scienceimage.csiro.au/image/7845/"><img src="https://www.scienceimage.csiro.au/images/embed/300_0_SN8673.jpg" width="300" alt="CSIRO scientist Dr Mohinudeen Faiz analyses a coal sample with methane-producing micro-organisms under the microscope" style="margin: 0 0 5px 0; border: 0px;"></a><br/><a href="https://www.scienceimage.csiro.au/image/7845/">CSIRO scientist Dr Mohinudeen Faiz analyses a coal sample with methane-producing micro-organisms under the microscope</a><br />by CSIRO</td></tr></table>
CSIRO scientist Dr Mohinudeen Faiz analyses a coal sample with methane-producing micro-organisms under the microscope
CSIRO scientist Dr Mohinudeen Faiz analyses a coal sample with methane-producing micro-organisms under the microscope
by CSIRO

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